Dance company of the Polish YMCA
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Dances & Music

Mazury's repertoire consists of over 30 dances

Take a look at some of our favourite numbers

Krakowiak

Krakowiak

The Krakowiak is the most popular national dance of Poland and the dances, songs and costume of this region symbolise the spirit of Poland.

Krakowiaczek

The "Little Krakowiak" is commonly performed by the youngest members of Mazury. 


Polonez

The Polonaise, a grand walking dance which gained great popularity not only in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, but also in the courts of Europe. Performed in the costumes of the Polish nobility of the 18th/19th century. Choreography by Włodek Lesiecki.

Kujawiak

A romantic dance from western Poland. The Kujawiak is one of the five national dances of Poland and was used as a theme for several of Chopin's works. Choreography by Jan Ciepliński.

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Mazur

Mazury have long performed two Mazurkas, both requiring energy and stamina that belies the impressive grace with which they are performed.

Mazur Ulański

The Mazurka, perhaps the best known of Polish dances, was danced by both peasants and nobles, and gained great popularity in the salons and courts of Europe. It is performed by Mazury in the uniforms of the 1st Lancers (1830), to music based on the mazurkas traditionally associated with the lancers. Choreography by Włodek Lesiecki.

Mazur Straszny Dwór

Mazury perform the splendid Mazurka from the opera ‘Straszny Dwór’ (The Haunted Manor) by Stanisław Moniuszko. First performance with the John Lewis Opera Society, London, April 1983. Choreography by Włodek Lesiecki.

Oberek

Oberek Łowicki

The Oberek, also known as the Round Dance, is popular throughout Poland. One version, with its characteristic brightly-striped and richly embroidered costumes, hails from Łowicz in central Poland. Choreography by Włodek Lesiecki.

Oberek Opoczyński

This dance hails from Opoczno in central Poland.


Góralskie

A medley of songs and dances from the Carpathian mountains including the Zbojnicki, the dance of the legendary mountain brigands whose leaders enjoyed mythical status akin to that of Robin Hood.


Some of the rest of our Polish Dance Repertoire

Hajduk Żywiecki Songs and dances from the Żywiec area of the Beskid highlands

Huculskie A medley of dances of the Hucul Highlanders from the area around Kołomyja in the South Eastern Carpathian Mountains. This area was for centuries part of the Polish Commonwealth, and today lies in Ukraine. These dances are still performed by the descendants of the Huculs now living in western Poland. 

Huculka (old version) One of the favourite dances of the Hucul Highlanders from the area around Kołomyja in the South Eastern Carpathian Mountains. This area (now in the Ukraine) was for centuries part of the Polish Commonwealth. (Choreography: Jan Ciepliński)

Kaszubskie These dances are from the Baltic coast of northern Poland. They begin with the girls asking the boys to dance and end with the pirates' or corsaires' dance, which is interrupted by the news that a shoal of herring has been spotted. At this the fishermen immediately put to sea!

Kołomyjka One of the favourite dances of the Hucul Highlanders from the area around Kołomyja in the South Eastern Carpathian Mountains. This area (now in the Ukraine) was for centuries part of the Polish Commonwealth.

Kujawiak A romantic dance from western Poland. The Kujawiak is one of the five national dances of Poland and was used as a theme for several of Chopin's works (Choreography: Jan Ciepliński)

Kujawiak weselny A romantic dance from western Poland. (Choreography: Jan Ciepliński)

Kurpiowskie Dances from the Kurpie forest in North Eastern Poland- the boys show off their athletic skills! The Kurpie is rich in folk craft and tradition and famous for its paper cut-outs and designs.

Lubelskie Dances from Lublin in central Eastern Poland that include the Polka, Oberek and Waltz.

Lwowskie The city of Lwów was for many centuries the second centre of Polish culture and learning. The ‘Batiary’ who lived in the Łyczaków district (much akin to the London cockneys), were well known for their strong allegiances as well as their sense of humour and ready wit. With a medley of popular songs and dances, we take you to downtown Lwów in the early 1900s.

Mazurskie These dances from the Mazury region (the Polish Lake District) are performed by the youngest members of the group. They reflect the local games and traditions which are especially popular with children.

Polka Niskowianka A polka from the Nowy Sącz region which lies between Kraków and the High Tatra mountains.

Rzeszowskie A lively medley from Rzeszów in South Eastern Poland, an area renowned for its high-spirited dancing. Rzeszów’s folk bands are well known in Poland for their skill and individuality. This medley shows off the dexterity of the musicians and reflects the humour of the dancers as they display their equally complicated polka steps. 

Sądeckie Songs and dances from the Nowy Sącz region, reflecting the folklore of both Kraków and the High Tatra mountains between which the area lies. Uninvited male guests at a wedding were allowed to stay provided they performed a traditional dance.

Sląskie Dances from Silesia in south western Poland – the Trojak (threesome), Szot Madziar (with Hungarian origins), Koziorajki, Kołomajki and Miotlarz (broom dance).

Spiskie Dances from the Spisz area of the Carpathian Mountains. The men from the village of Kacwin meet the girls from Jurgow. They are interrupted by the gypsies from Czarna Gora and the medley finishes with a joint finale. (Original Choreography: W.Lesiecki. Revised Choreography (2018): Zosia Lesiecka & Lucjan Santos-Witkowski)

Szamotulskie The Szamotuły region is known for its horse breeding and riding. This is reflected in the men’s costumes and in the character of the dances of this area. 

Trojak Danced in threes performed by the boys in traditional Silesian miners' uniforms.